Throughout The Universe, In Perpetuity: Why I Don’t Sign Copyright Grabbing Photo Contracts
By Misery Xchord

Brisbane-based photographer Justin Edwards talks about copyright grabbing photo contracts and poses some disturbing questions about the future of concert photography if they became an industry standard, much like the ubiquitous “3 songs no flash” commonly seen today.

And once it does happen, where will it go after that? To me it’s obvious where it will go next.  If you sign a copyright grabbing contract, instead of being escorted out of the venue after three songs, as happens now at the big shows, you will be escorted by the band’s representative to a laptop and told to download a copy of the photos you’ve just taken onto the hard drive.

As ridiculous as it sounds, why wouldn’t they? They’re their photos, not yours.  They own them, not you.  They’re just taking their property, and if you signed that contract you’re powerless to stop them.  What are you going to do? Refuse? Just walk out?  At best you’ll be blacklisted from shooting anymore shows through that promoter/for that act’s management.  Legally you’ve got someone else’s property and they’ve got the bit of paper that you’ve signed saying so.  The only surprise is that they don’t already do it and if they’re putting a rights’ grabbing clause in their release form they’re crazy not to be doing it. “

 

Read more on his blog: Throughout The Universe, In Perpetuity: Why I Don’t Sign Copyright Grabbing Photo Contracts

Misery Xchord (97 Posts)

i am a very pretty hate machine. artist | illustrator | blogger | photographer (not a terrorist)








Related posts:

A Concert Photographer's Manifesto on Copyright Grabbing Contracts
Save Image As: Combating Internet Photo Theft « Cary Liao
First Three No Flash, Oh yeah and give us all your pictures for free…